The Ants of Oklahoma Project is now funded by The Alongside Wildlife Foundation

We were recently awarded a grant from The Alongside Wildlife Foundation to support our citizen science research project: The Ants of Oklahoma! For the past few years, Diane and I have been talking and writing about some of the cool ants we have discovered in Oklahoma. In 2017, we decided we could do more. BasedContinue reading “The Ants of Oklahoma Project is now funded by The Alongside Wildlife Foundation”

Media coverage of our paper examining how floods impact invertebrate communities

Our recent work on the 2015 flood at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station and its impact on invertebrate communities was just covered in a EurekAlert from AAAS and by the Entomology Today blog hosted by the Entomological Society of America. You can find links to both below. EurekAlert: [CLICK HERE] Entomology Today Blog: [CLICK HERE] Paper:Continue reading “Media coverage of our paper examining how floods impact invertebrate communities”

NEW PAPER OUT! Disturbance mediates homogenization of above and belowground invertebrate communities

Our manuscript about the impact of flooding on invertebrate communities at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station (UOBS) has been officially accepted at Environmental Entomology! This project has some interesting origins. In between my written and oral comprehensive exams, I desperately wanted to be outside doing well….anything. We had heard that an area of the UOBSContinue reading “NEW PAPER OUT! Disturbance mediates homogenization of above and belowground invertebrate communities”

NEON ANTS Fieldwork Finale

Fieldwork for NEON ants is now complete. From Oregon to Southern California across to Florida and then up to Massachusetts—35 sites were resampled in deserts, grasslands, and forests. There is a hell of a lot of data from this project and I am very grateful that I was able to partake in part of it.Continue reading “NEON ANTS Fieldwork Finale”

NEON Ants 2017: Site 9 and 10 – Organ Pipe National Monument and Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch, Arizona

The final leg of the NEON ants 2017 project—an NSF funded project— has come and gone. We visited two beautiful locations: Organ Pipe National Monument and Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch. Both of these sites were in Arizona, a state that harbors some of the greatest ant diversity in North America. Now that the fieldwork is done,Continue reading “NEON Ants 2017: Site 9 and 10 – Organ Pipe National Monument and Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch, Arizona”

NEON Ants 2017: Site 8 – Boyd Deep Canyon Desert Research Center, California

Every once in a while you get the feeling of being in a magical place. A place few have been before, and one that few will probably visit in the future. While the Boyd Deep Canyon Desert Research Center is visited by students of the University of California system for field trips and field work,Continue reading “NEON Ants 2017: Site 8 – Boyd Deep Canyon Desert Research Center, California”

NEON Ants 2017: Site 7 – El Centro, California

The NEON ants crew is back at it after a short hiatus for the Ecological Society of America Annual meeting. This time we are headed to the lovely south western United States. Our first stop is right on the border of Southern California and Mexico around the town of El Centro. A funny story. HavingContinue reading “NEON Ants 2017: Site 7 – El Centro, California”

Neon Blog Post: “Researchers leverage NEON field sites to find out what ants can tell us about changing climates”

The National Ecological Observatory Network (or NEON for short) just released a blog post about some of the work that we have been doing over the past two years. In it, they describe what we are up to (like the above image of how we sample 1-m² plots for ants) and some things still toContinue reading “Neon Blog Post: “Researchers leverage NEON field sites to find out what ants can tell us about changing climates””

Neon Ants 2017-Part 3: Myles Standish State Forest, Massachusetts and Cedar Creek LTER, Minnesota

I haven been quite busy catching up on writing and reviewing manuscripts so this update will more or less be just a slide show of the last 2 sites that we visited before coming home to Oklahoma. Sites 5 and 6 of the Neon Ants 2017 project visited the beautiful Myles Standish State Forest inContinue reading “Neon Ants 2017-Part 3: Myles Standish State Forest, Massachusetts and Cedar Creek LTER, Minnesota”

Neon Ants 2017-Part 2: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER, Virginia and Harvard Forest LTER, Massachusetts

Sites 3 and 4 of the Neon Ants 2017 project visited two wonderful LTER sites on the east coast of the USA: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER, Virginia and the Harvard Forest LTER, Massachusetts. The LTER (Long Term Ecological Research: https://lternet.edu/) program covers 25 different ecosystems from Alaska to the Caribbean including deserts, estuaries, lakes, oceans,Continue reading “Neon Ants 2017-Part 2: Virginia Coast Reserve LTER, Virginia and Harvard Forest LTER, Massachusetts”